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Could Homes of the Future Assemble Themselves?

Posted by Matt Power, Editor-In-Chief

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Dec 22, 2015 9:12:25 AM

Researchers exploring the new world of “aleatory architecture” say that this technology is mature enough to make such applications possible.

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MIT Technology Review reports that this technology has finally reached the useful stage. They envision it opening up whole new possibilities for architects.

"Traditionally, architects have started with the smallest structural components such as columns, arches, walls, and so on and joined them together to form larger structures such as bridges, houses, and skyscrapers.But the properties of these new granular materials turn this approach on its head.  With this stuff, architects can think about the overall form and then work out how it can be achieved by pouring the granular material into place."

They add that:

"A more ambitious goal is to come up with the overall structure and then work backward to determine the shape of the particles that would produce it when poured. These granules could then be 3-D printed and poured into place, where they would self-assemble or be assembled using a robot.

That will have a profound effect on the process of design. “As a result, preplanning is freed from considering the local structural detail,” say Keller and Jaeger. “Instead, the main task now becomes generating the proper particle shapes as well as the overall boundary and processing conditions to guarantee that the desired target structure will be mechanically stable when realized.”

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