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How Much Energy Do Cat Doors Waste?

Posted by Matt Power

Jul 8, 2014 9:19:00 PM

The Bottom Line: Passive leaks around cat doors waste WAY more energy than slow moving cats.

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Why Should You Make an Eco-Friendly Garage?

Posted by Justin White

Jun 30, 2014 7:50:00 PM

Many people think of green products and principles while planning a new home, but they may not consider the impact of the home's garage.

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This Odor-Free Urinal Works Without Water

Posted by GBM Research

Jun 24, 2014 7:41:00 AM

By Klaus Reichardt

ADMITTEDLY, URINALS ARE NOT an everyday topic of conversation. And when it comes to homes and apartments, they almost never enter the discussion. However, that may be changing and changing very soon.

Home urinals, ranging in popularity, have been found in parts of Asia, Europe, Australia, and even in India. However, the trend in the United States is still in its infancy. In addition, the economy, which has severely impacted the housing construction industry, has slowed things down considerably.

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Add a Fresh Air Intake to Your Wood Stove to Avoid Toxic Indoor Air

Posted by Matt Power

Jun 23, 2014 7:17:00 PM

Too often, wood burning boilers and stoves are installed without a dedicated fresh air source. Stoves without a source of fresh air can badly pollute your home's air with dangerous flue gases--leading to asthma or other illnesses. Here are several solutions.

WHILE DOING SOME RESEARCH on fresh air intake for wood boilers, I found this fascinating illustration of a do-it-yourself fresh air return. I haven't tried building one myself, but it looks like it might just work as a low-budget way to provide the "makeup" air a wood burner needs and maintain healthy indoor air. And conveniently enough, there's a company that sells miniature heat exchanger "coils" and pipe lengths that will allow you to build this Rube Goldberg-looking contraption quite easily.

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How Long Do the Parts of a House Last?

Posted by Matt Power

Jun 20, 2014 6:49:22 PM

A FEW YEARS BACK, I wrote an article called "Building Blind," that exposed some major flaws in the way products are installed in new homes, with no regard for how one product limits the lifespan of another. For example, putting thin asphalt felt (tar paper) under clay roof tiles means you will have to remove those tiles when the paper fails in about 20 years, whereas the tiles might have lasted for centuries.

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