Green Builder Media Logo

 ABOUT • CONTACT • SUBSCRIBE • ADVERTISE

Juliet Grable

Find me on:

Recent Posts

Landscaping with Trees

Posted by Juliet Grable

Mar 27, 2015 2:55:15 PM

Trees are a site’s biggest asset. These guidelines will help you protect and manage them through a construction project and beyond.

ASIDE FROM ADDING beauty to landscapes, trees perform several vital functions. They help stabilize soils, absorb rainwater and reduce the velocity and volume of rainwater hitting concrete and other impervious surfaces. They provide shade, especially on south and west façades; in the dry climate of the Southwest, for example, a shade tree can lower temperatures by up to 20 degrees. Trees also block wind, especially when planted near north façades. And they capture and store carbon.

Read More

Managing Stormwater

Posted by Juliet Grable

Mar 16, 2015 1:00:48 PM

These eco-sensitive strategies help keep pollutants out of streams and lakes, replenish groundwater and green the built environment.

NATURAL LANDSCAPES naturally slow the movement of stormwater, and capture and filter some of it as it percolates back into the groundwater supply. But the built environment is dominated by impervious surfaces. Paved surfaces, roofs and building façades change the movement of water over the landscape and increase the volume, speed and temperature of the runoff. Rushing stormwater picks up pollutants, fertilizers and pesticides and can also cause flooding and erosion.

Read More

Graywater Reuse

Posted by Juliet Grable

Mar 12, 2015 7:14:13 PM

Now that codes are finally getting friendlier, it’s time to start incorporating graywater recycling into landscape plans.

GRAYWATER IS USED household water that has not come into contact with toilet wastewater. It represents two-thirds of a typical household’s indoor water budget. Reusing graywater to irrigate landscaping keeps it onsite and conserves potable water, easing the burden on both water treatment and wastewater treatment plants. Unfortunately, state regulations have made legal use of graywater difficult, if not impossible—although that is changing.

Read More

Water Conservation: Putting It All Together

Posted by Juliet Grable

Mar 10, 2015 11:14:29 AM

The water crisis will prompt us not only to rethink our approach to landscaping, but how we treat, use and recycle water inside our homes.

States that already experience high per capita water use will feel the crunch as their populations grow.

Read More

Water Conservation by Stormwater Management

Posted by Juliet Grable

Sep 8, 2014 3:18:51 PM

We've let our stormwater get away from us. These water conservation practices can help clean it up and encourage it to stick around.

STORMWATER RUNOFF is rain or snowmelt that flows over the land without percolating into the soil. Stormwater occurs naturally, especially during large rain events, but nature’s sponge—the water-absorbing cover of trees, shrubs and other vegetation hugging our planet—usually takes care of the rest. Unfortunately, we’ve turned our world into a hard place. Paved sidewalks, asphalt parking lots, concrete curbs, streets, driveways, roofs and building facades—all of these impervious surfaces change the natural movement of water over the landscape, and increase the volume, speed and temperature of the runoff.

Read More
Green Builder Media Impact Series Archive

 

 

View the Sustainability Toolkit