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Pierre Delforge, Guest Columnist

Recent Posts

New Study Confirms Benefits of Electrifying CA Buildings

Posted by Pierre Delforge, Guest Columnist

Apr 17, 2019 3:42:50 PM

Replacing natural gas (methane) with clean electricity, particularly for heating and hot water production, will slash greenhouse gas emissions from California's single-family homes by up to 90 percent within the next three decades and save consumers money in the process, according to a new analysis released today. The study confirms electrification is a vital and cost-effective tool in reducing climate and toxic air pollution from gas combustion in buildings, which account for a quarter of the state total climate emissions.

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CA Building Code Takes Big Step Toward Net-Zero Energy

Posted by Pierre Delforge, Guest Columnist

May 10, 2018 9:01:59 AM

The updated code — the first of its kind in the nation — will combine rooftop solar panels with enough energy efficiency measures like insulation and better windows that all new single-family homes and low-rise apartments will use net-zero electricity.

How would you like living in a home with a dramatically reduced electric bill? That will be a reality for most new homes in California starting in 2020, thanks to a new building energy code adopted today by the California Energy Commission. The updated code — the first of its kind in the nation —  will combine rooftop solar panels with enough energy efficiency measures like insulation and better windows that all new single-family homes and low-rise apartments will use net-zero electricity. This means that their solar array should offset all electricity use for cooling, plug-in equipment, and lighting on an annual basis. 

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Buildings: The Next Frontier for CA Clean Energy Leadership

Posted by Pierre Delforge, Guest Columnist

Jan 7, 2018 2:41:43 PM

California’s ambitious climate policies are clearing the air, cleaning up the state’s electricity supply, and getting cleaner vehicles onto the roads.

But California’s residential and commercial buildings today are responsible for similar levels of climate pollution as all in-state power plants, mostly from natural gas used in furnaces and water heaters. Policymakers in California took some encouraging steps to address these emissions in 2017, but there’s much more to be done so that buildings don’t hold California back from achieving its climate and clean air goals.

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