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Matt Power, Editor-In-Chief

As a veteran reporter, Matt Power has covered virtually every aspect of design and construction. His award-winning articles often tackle tough environmental challenges in a way that makes them relevant to both professionals and end users. An expert on both building science and green building, he has a long history of asking hard questions--and adding depth and context as he unfolds complex issues. Matt is a founding member of the Tiny House Industry Association, and sits on the board of The Resilience Hub, an educational organization focused on permaculture and hands-on reskilling.
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Recent Posts

Five Ways to Reduce Your Dehumidifier Dependence

Posted by Matt Power, Editor-In-Chief

Nov 3, 2017 10:42:56 AM

Compact, portable dehumidifiers use a lot of energy, and now some are connected with house fires. But there are greener options.

Before we talk about alternatives to energy-sucking dehumidifiers, here's a video sample of some of the controversy surrounding these machines.

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Will Synthetic Fabrics Be Remembered As the Nuclear Waste of Our Time?

Posted by Matt Power, Editor-In-Chief

Feb 28, 2017 10:00:00 AM

New research finds that synthetics are a primary cause of invisible ocean pollution. But getting rid of them safely is an unsolved challenge.

WE ALL KNOW (OR SHOULD) THAT THE OCEANS ARE FULL OF FLOATING PLASTICS. But the visible stuff is just the tip of the proverbial iceberg. It's the microparticles that are really scary. And floating plastic eventually becomes microparticles. There's even evidence that some fish now PREFER these tiny plastic particles to plankton. Sort of puts you off blackened snapper, eh?

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Solutions to Climate Change are Simple, but Human Beings Would Rather Pretend They Are Powerless Puppets

Posted by Matt Power, Editor-In-Chief

Feb 21, 2017 9:33:00 AM

If you're middle class, still eating meat, heating your home with oil, buying plastic-wrapped goods—or having more than two children, ask not for whom the bell tolls.

Back in January, I was asked to pen a "Declaration of Interdependence" to set the stage for a sustainability summit in Orlando. My task was to quickly spell out the worst environmental challenges of our time, and offer some solutions for discussion during the event. The problem part was easy. We're heating up the climate, and wiping out HALF OF ALL SPECIES on Earth, destroying ocean life all over the world, and generally turning paradise into dystopia.

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Why Do Agencies Tracking the Rise in Deadly Childhood Brain Cancer Ignore Cellphones?

Posted by Matt Power, Editor-In-Chief

Sep 16, 2016 5:52:59 PM

A new report notes that childhood brain cancer in the U.S. is now the leading killer disease in that age group. It's time to look harder at cellphone risks.

When we wrote an article about electromagnetic field hazards a few years ago, it became one of our most read stories ever, attracting thousands of readers every month from all over the world. Yet despite occasional alarms about possible health risks, little has been done to regulate that industry, or to warn kids about what may be a deadly, ubiquitous health hazard.

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GE Smart "Aros" Window Air Conditioner Could Be a Game Changer

Posted by Matt Power, Editor-In-Chief

May 4, 2016 9:20:17 AM

The new units retail for $400, but if you do the math, you're getting a great deal, and addressing a major global warming contributor.

Typical window air conditioners, the kind you pick up at Wal-Mart for $150 bucks, is about as "smart" as a toaster, and far more polluting. It's noisy, inefficient, with minimal controls and, if you're lucky, an on-board thermostat.

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Save Your Money--Reverse Osmosis Filters May Last Much Longer Than Recommended

Posted by Matt Power, Editor-In-Chief

Apr 1, 2016 1:17:36 PM

Attention: That blinking "replace me" light isn't measuring your filter's efficiency. It's measuring time.

I recently purchased and installed an inexpensive (about $150) reverse osmosis water filter that goes under my kitchen sink, freeing me from the tyrrany of bottle water. Aside from the slight gurgling noises it makes as the tank refills, I love being able to refill my stainless steel water bottle any time I like, without adding more plastic to the world's oceans, or putting more money in the pockets of multinational sellers such as Nestle (Poland Springs) of what should be our natural birthright: clean water.

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Low-Cost Infrared Light Switch Is an Easy DIY Install

Posted by Matt Power, Editor-In-Chief

Jan 19, 2016 12:44:43 PM

Now available at a third the price they were a year ago, light-activating switches have finally hit the mainstream.

I remember when my three-story hallway was wired with occupancy sensors a few years ago. Each of the three 360-degree ceiling mounted sensors cost almost $75.00, plus the labor to install them.

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Refinish a Food-Safe Green Countertop with Pennies

Posted by Matt Power, Editor-In-Chief

Nov 15, 2015 9:28:00 AM

By using a food-safe resin, you can create a durable countertop that should last many years.

AN ARTICLE in Instructables caught my eye this morning. Someone posted about using pennies to recondition an old counter-top and make it look like a million bucks: Just add pennies. While pennies are not free, they're easy enough to save over time, and before you know it, you'll have enough for a good-sized surface.

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