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Code Action Items to Start the New Year

Check out action items and requests from IAPMO, Washington, Ohio, and Illinois need your attention as 2022 dawns.

IAPMO

IAPMO has two proposal solicitations active until 5 pm PT on March 4, 2022. 

WE Stand – They have a formal call for proposals toward the development of the 2023 edition of this standard. They have one central page that includes a change proposal form, proposal instructions, and background on IAPMO’s ANSI-accredited consensus process. To access it, please click here. All proposals recommending new text, revised text, or the deletion of text must be written in a legislative format and clearly state the reason behind the recommendation.

USHGC and USPSHTC – They have issued a call for formal code proposals toward the development of the 2024 editions of the Uniform Solar, Hydronics and Geothermal Code (USHGC) and Uniform Swimming Pool, Spa, and Hot Tub Code (USPSHTC). Both are American National Standard designated model codes. They have one central page that includes a change proposal form, proposal instructions, and background on IAPMO’s ANSI-accredited consensus process. To access it, please click here. All proposals recommending new text, revised text, or the deletion of text must be written in a legislative format and clearly state the reason behind the recommendation.

Washington

The state’s updated commercial and residential energy codes went into effect in early February 2021, but those codes are based on the 2018 model code and were adopted in the second half of 2019. That’s important context as the state prepares to embark upon another energy code update.

The residential code change development process has begun, with the state building code council (SBCC) reviewing the 2021 IECC for significant changes. The submission period for proposed state amendments is expected to open in Q1 2022. While it is not open yet, interested parties should start preparing now.

Ohio

The Public Utilities Commission (PUCO) will host a series of energy efficiency workshops to solicit the views of stakeholders on whether cost-effective energy efficiency programs are an appropriate tool to manage electric generation costs, and how those fit into Ohio’s competitive electric and natural gas marketplaces. 

Five workshops are scheduled from March through April 2022 and will involve presenters from particular stakeholder groups. The workshops will take place at approximately 2:00 pm ET, and conclude at 4:00 pm ET. The workshops will also be live-streamed on the PUCO’s YouTube channel and all workshops are open to the public. The topics for each of these workshops are:

March 2 – Electric &amp; natural gas industries

March 9 – business sector, part 1

March 23 – consumer sector

March 30 – business sector, part 2 

April 6 – environmental sector

If you wish to present during an upcoming energy efficiency workshop, please send an email to energyefficiency@puco.ohio.gov. The number of presenters may need to be limited to accommodate the time constraints for each workshop. However, anyone may attend a workshop or provide written comments as described below.

The PUCO has prepared 14 questions to facilitate the discussions during the workshops. You can review all 14 questions, along with all other workshop details, here. Responses and comments may be submitted by January 28 to energyefficiency@puco.ohio.gov. All written submissions will be posted online. They ask that you avoid discussion of pending cases and pending litigation.

Illinois

The Illinois Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Office of Energy announced a new Low Income Energy Efficiency Retrofit Program to deliver grants to public housing authorities, units of local government, and/or nonprofit organizations for implementation of energy-efficiency improvements in single or multi-family residential properties. 

They are accepting applications until 5:00 pm CT on January 12 to deliver a total of $2 million in grants to public housing authorities, municipalities, and nonprofit organizations to carry out energy efficiency upgrades in low-income housing. Eligible projects include, but are not limited to:

  • Building Envelope insulation
  • Window replacement
  • Space heating and cooling equipment retrofit
  • Heating and cooling distribution system retrofit
  • Installation of efficient domestic hot water equipment
  • Lighting upgrades (indoor and/or outdoor)
  • High-efficiency appliance installation/replacement
  • Programmable thermostats installation
  • Energy metering changes 

To be considered for funding, energy efficiency projects must cost a minimum of $25,000 and a maximum of $500,000, and be located at low-income residential properties served by a municipally-owned electric utility or electric cooperative. The cost share requirements range from 2% to 10% dependent upon the total award request. For complete program information, including application forms, please click here.