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EDITOR'S DESK

Matt Power Editor In Chief

The Downsizing Shell Game. Upscale condos and apartments have the potential to reduce their owners’ overall resource consumption, but it’s tough to make a green argument for them.. READ ON

CURRENT ISSUE

JUNE, 2014: Back to the City

THIS ISSUE, WE LOOK AT the need for an urban inmigration, and the booming market for new greenbuildercoverjune2014-1and retrofitted rental housing.. The American Dream is slowly changing, as the high social, financial and environmental costs of living in suburbia continue to take their toll. Looming over everything is the imminent threat of Climate Change. But all is not lost.Smart people are rethinking how we travel from place to place, and makes city life desirable. The market for urban infill is on the rise. In this issue, we'll inspire you with some exciting rental projects, plus clever ways to make smaller rental spaces attractive and viable. The future lies in cities, but only if we make them happy places. The alternative, more sprawl, more ecological destruction, is simply not an option. READ ONLINE NOW

 

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  • The City of the Future

    CELESTIA-CHAPTER 3

    The third chapter of The Celestia Project looks at transportation and urbanization. How will we get around? What will cities look and feel like in 2100? Our predictions may surprise you. (Click Image for full story. Text version HERE.)

ALSO IN THIS ISSUE: Transformations: Living Large in Small Spaces
pocketdoor

Take a look at some of the latest clever ideas and products now available to organize, declutter and make small spaces feel large. The age of the micro apartment and tiny home has come, and it's a good thing for the environment. From secret doors to recessed cabinets to fold-down, built-in beds and dining tables, these are off-the-shelf solutions to tough space problems. READ IT HERE.

MARKET WATCH

CodeWatchUpdateNOW THAT CONSUMER confidence seems to be coming back, and the housing market is picking up (with demand even exceeding supply in some cases), the temptation to go back to the rush of the early 2000s could be great. Don't go there. MORE