Options for Community Living

Posted by Green Builder Staff

Sep 2, 2016 12:11:08 PM

This renovated 1,436-square-foot 1970s ranch earns a HERS score of 40—lower than most new builds.

When most people think efficiency, they think of newly built houses. In this case, the United Way of Long Island Housing Development Corporation completely renovated a 1,436-square-foot, three-bedroom 1970s ranch in Patchogue, N.Y., on Long Island. The home now earns a HERS score of 40—a lower score than most new builds.

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Taos Treasure

Posted by Green Builder Staff

May 20, 2015 1:38:00 PM

The bath and kitchen in this Passivhaus, which is part of a senior co-housing community, feature clean lines and compact design.

PHOTOS BY AMADEUS LEITNER

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Trendsetter

Posted by Green Builder Staff

Jan 14, 2015 12:58:00 PM

KTGY Group and Garbett Homes Share History. Their first collaborative project, Solaris, was a collection of affordable entry-level homes powered by solar and geothermal energy. With Bellasol, they set a new goal: to build a net-zero-energy home with a HERS score of at least 5. The house modeled at HERS 2, but after it was built it earned an impressive score of -1. Read More

Game Changer

Posted by Green Builder Staff

Jan 5, 2015 12:52:40 PM

For Tom Elliott and Barbara Scott, Desert Rain is more than a home; it is an outer expression of the couple’s inner values and beliefs. When they purchased two lots near downtown Bend, Oregon, six years ago, their intention was to build a super-green “residential compound”—a main house, two smaller dwellings, garages and infrastructure—to LEED Platinum standards. They wanted to break the pattern of “one lot, one house” in favor of denser development that fostered a strong sense of community. Read More

Innovative Passive House: Uber Haus

Posted by Green Builder Staff

Aug 26, 2014 11:19:09 AM

DUBBED "PASSIVE HOUSE IN THE WOODS", this project takes energy efficiency far beyond the experience of most residential builders. It’s a bleeding edge design, a strikingly modern structure that produces 65% more electricity than it needs. It also has an interesting back story.

“The client’s wife was ill with cancer as we were planning this home,” notes architect Tim Delhey Eian.
“She passed away before construction began, and we ended up changing the design to a much more vertical plan.

“We chose ICFs deliberately, as a pretty fail-safe construction method,” he adds. “I had a good grasp of Passivhaus concepts, because I grew up in Germany and completed the training there.”

Deep Science
Although the systems in this home are familiar, this project takes them to a higher level. The ICFs, for example, extend below grade, and are augmented with a commercial-grade EIFS system that includes 11” of EPS foam above grade—making a wall 22” thick with an R-value of 70.

“We tried to get the North American branch (of Sto Corp.) to provide the details we wanted, but the deal fell through,” the architect notes. “They only offered this version of EIFS in Europe. It puts all of the water management on the exterior. They’ve now started offering it in the U.S.”

The flat roof includes 14” of polyisocyanurate foam, achieving R-95, and the windows and doors, imported from Germany, are triple-pane, low-E coated, with insulated frames. They have an installed R-value of 8. By comparison, a typical wood or vinyl-framed, dual-pane, low-E window achieves only about R-2.

The slab also sits on 12” of EPS foam (R-60), and the garage doors are insulated as well, so the overall heating demand for the home is extremely low. In fact, it has no furnace and no fireplace, despite the cold climate. The home, designed for a heating load of just 3,000 W, relies on passive solar plus a modest ground loop geothermal system, with a back up of electrical floor mats from Nuheat. A super-efficient HRV provides ventilation to the whole house, with minimal loss of BTU.

Along with the 4.5 kW PV panels, the house has a 40-sq.-ft. hot water solar collector that provides 90% of the home’s hot water demand. A small electric hot water heater provides the rest.

Ongoing Improvements
The architect notes that by monitoring the home’s performance during the first year, the team was able to identify hidden energy wasters. “For instance,” he says, “we now know that the well pump was using a lot of energy—12% of the home’s consumption for a year. That was easy to improve.

“At the same time,” he adds, “some of the appliances out-performed our original estimates, in part because they weren’t used as much as expected. But we’re now extrapolating from the lifestyle impacts.”

Too often, notes the architect, home owners look at the aspects of a home that are not important—things that “are really going to go down the drain.” Not so, with this house, he says. It’s a project that ultimately gives the owner freedom—so “he won’t owe monthly bills to anyone.”


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