Fine Footprint

Posted by Green Builder Staff

Jan 20, 2016 6:50:39 PM

Built to withstand tough New England storms, this custom home also achieves a -23 HERS Index score.

THIS TRADITIONAL LOOKING New England home was designed by homeowners Elizabeth Wegner and Carl Benker with three goals in mind: durability, energy efficiency and health. The home reflects the couple’s desire to substantially reduce their negative environmental impact on the world. It was built by Glastonbury Housesmith, which constructed the first LEED certified Gold house in Connecticut.  The house was constructed to meet the most up-to-date residential building codes (2012 IRC, 2012 IECC) rather than those which are required in the state. The most notable requirements of the new codes are a stronger structure to withstand high hurricane winds and exterior insulation outside of the wall sheathing to prevent condensation—and subsequently, mold and/or rot—within the walls. An Uponor fire sprinkler system was also integrated with the domestic cold water plumbing.

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Wide Open Island Living

Posted by Green Builder Staff

May 18, 2015 10:40:47 AM

The kitchen and bath in this LEED Platinum home in Hawaii feature water-efficient fixtures and healthy, low-maintenance finishes.

PHOTOS BY AUGIE SALBOA

THE WA'AHILA RIDGE custom Craftsman home, designed by Hawaii-based Archipelago Hawaii and built by MOKULUA HPB, marries design with building science in a truly collaborative process. Completed in 2013, it is one of the only LEED Platinum-certified homes in the state and has achieved a HERS rating of 15.

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Gathering Place

Posted by Green Builder Staff

Aug 20, 2014 11:20:00 AM

OUR JUDGES DID NOT select this home lightly during the 2011 Green Home of the Year contest. There was serious debate about whether its grandiose scale should count against its “green” building science. In the end, however, the ecological zeal of its execution won them over. Read More

4D Home Creates Solar Upgrade for Existing Homes

Posted by Green Builder Staff

Jul 27, 2012 2:09:00 PM

Homeowners adding solar PV or thermal systems are often stymied when they discover that their homes' roof is not strong enough to support panels or faces the wrong way for optimal performance. Plus, every roof penetration is an invitation to spring a leak.

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