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On the Edge

Posted by Green Builder Staff

Aug 22, 2014 4:56:41 PM

UNDER NORMAL CIRCUMSTANCES, it would be hard to imagine a home on this site, high atop a cliff, surrounded by breathtaking views. But neither this home, known as the Zero Energy Idea House, nor its
architect, are of the average variety.

“It’s self-evident that this design is saying ‘I’m a different kind of house,’” says architect David Clinkston. “That was the intention—that you see the green roofs, PV panels, solar hot water panels and vertical axis windmill. These are all visible from the road. A ‘green wall’ at the main entrance (to reduce afternoon solar gain) is another clue that all is not ‘normal’ with this house.” The wall is a galvanized steel grid that will provide privacy when vines grow over it.

Not every aspect of the home’s infrastructure is obvious, of course. The structural  insulated panel (SIP) structure sits atop concrete grade beams that thrust back into the steep slope, and the below-grade wall at the back of the house was poured into ICFs.

The house is heated with a Warmboard radiant floor system—wood panels coated with reflective aluminum.

“That aluminum skin is thick,” Clinkston says. “with grooves that direct the heat exactly where you want it.”

Advanced Engineering
The architect took the owner’s interest in “seeing the bones” of the home seriously, specifying a steel frame as the carriage for the SIPs.

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Topics: SIPs, solar, green roof, rainwater harvesting, alternative energy, 2011 Green Home of the Year Awards

New Florida

Posted by Matt Power

Apr 15, 2014 4:57:00 PM

Florida, one of the fastest growing states, is not known for its green housing. But this LEED Gold home in Winter Park, not far from Orlando, breaks that pattern. Its contemporary design contains many elements familiar in what you might call the “snowbird vernacular” of modern Florida architecture: large expanses of glass, an open floorplan, a back yard lanai, and an open interior with little trim. But unlike so many Florida homes--built to code but no better--nearly every aspect of this home has an energy- or water-saving purpose.  
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Topics: Green Landscaping, LEED, Energy Recovery Ventilation, HERS, 2600 to 3400 square feet, natural daylighting, green roof, 2010 Green Home of the Year Awards, LED Lighting, rainwater harvesting, salvaged materials, Florida, Recycled Products

Five Easy Pieces

Posted by Matt Power

Apr 15, 2014 3:05:00 PM

Photos by Jack Parsons Photography; Mary Estes contributed to this article.
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Topics: graywater, California, SIPs, 1500 square feet or less, green roof, cool roof

Urban Uplift

Posted by Matt Power

Dec 1, 2013 2:43:00 PM

2013 Green Home of the Year Awards
Best Infill Home - Seattle, Wash.

This bright, efficient home shows how sustainability is possible—even on a compact city parcel.


THE 2,710-SQUARE-FOOT PARK Passive is Seattle’s first certified Passivhaus. Built on a small, 2,000-square-foot infill lot in the Madison Park neighborhood, the home is larger in square footage than the lot.

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Topics: 2600 to 3400 square feet, green roof, 2013 Green Home of the Year Awards, Washington

Natural Synergy

Posted by Cati O'Keefe

Dec 1, 2013 12:53:00 PM

Green Home of the Year Awards 2013
Best Exterior Integration - Sonoma, Calif.

This LEED platinum house boasts roof gardens and thoughtful landscaping.

FARM HOUSE VERNACULAR and chicken coops were the design inspiration for the 3,960-square-foot, two-story home. Covered walkways, gardens and a pool link the simple gabled structures into a family compound.

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Topics: Geothermal Heating and Cooling, graywater, California, Green Landscaping, LEED, 1500 square feet or less, solar hot water, straw bale, Low Flow Faucets, natural daylighting, green roof, 2013 Green Home of the Year Awards, rainwater harvesting


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