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Site Sensitivity

Posted by Suchi Rudra

Sep 15, 2014 4:57:57 PM

WHEN KAREN AND DAVE DAVIS decided to build a second home in Martha’s Vineyard with absolute minimum environmental impact, they chose to work with local design/build firm South Mountain Company. Founder John Abrams and his team had been building finely crafted and sustainable houses since 1975, and quickly realized that the site for this particular house near Chilmark Pond was a designer’s dream: a south-facing slope with wonderful views of the south shore. However, this very slope and the narrowness of the site also proved challenging to work around.

“Zoning restrictions regulated the height, roof pitch and footprint, and we also wanted to be very conscientious of the view of the building from the beach and the neighbors downhill,” says Abrams. “Additionally, the traffic on South Road moves noisily by the house just to the north.”

These factors led the team to build into the hillside, burying the side of the house that is exposed to the road and winter winds, and opening up the house on the south side “like a flower” to the sun and the view. A large part of the 3,300-square-foot, four-bedroom house is below grade, making the house feel smaller than it is. By using the basement as living space and shifting it out from under the first floor, Abrams says the house becomes less massive from the south and the feeling of being in a basement is diminished. Part of the house has a living roof, which replaces some of the rain absorption area that is typically removed when a building covers the land.

Abundant daylight is delivered to the northernmost rooms and basement through a clerestory that arches in the middle “to mimic the path of the sun,” and via strategically placed interior windows and glass block in the floor. Good daylighting, as well as efficient appliances and fixtures, helps to reduce electrical demands.

To minimize fossil fuel use and energy consumption while maximizing comfort and simplifying operation, South Mountain focused on creating a super energy-efficient building envelope. Combining this with passive solar strategies allows the house to be left unheated in the winter without freezing. The envelope also keeps the house cool in the summer—and with the help of ocean breezes, there’s no need for air conditioning.

Solar energy from a PV solar array on the garage roof is harnessed to heat water and produces enough electricity to offset household consumption, including the electricity that was consumed during the home’s construction. The solar electric system was sized to match predicted future energy demand of a part-time residence, but can be upgraded if the house is occupied full time.

Abrams finds that building net-zero houses, at least locally, tends to cost 7 to 10 percent more in terms of initial capital investment than a typical house built to code, but the investments pay off. Since March 2008, the Davis home has consumed 39,950 kWh (6,323 kWh/year) and generated 44,708 kWh (7,077 kWh/year). The solar has net metering, so the family receives energy from the grid as needed and exports the excess.

Most materials in the building are salvaged, procured from renewable sources or are easy to recycle. The materials were specifically chosen to be timeless and “not necessary to replace once out of fashion,” Abrams adds.

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Topics: net-zero energy, graywater, passive solar, 2600 to 3400 square feet, green roof, Low-E Window glazing, salvaged materials, Building Envelope

The Good Life

Posted by Green Builder Staff

Jun 2, 2014 12:26:00 PM

WHEN YOU SEE A TULIKIVI masonry hearth in a custom home, you know you’ve entered a rarefied green home. It’s as revealing as seeing a Rolls Royce parked in a home’s garage (although that sends a very different message). You already know a lot about the owners.

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Topics: net-zero energy, solar, 2600 to 3400 square feet, natural daylighting, spray foam insulation

Natural Fit

Posted by Green Builder Staff

May 14, 2014 10:07:00 AM

ALTHOUGH YOU CAN'T tell from the finished product, this 3,012 sq. ft. home in Livermore, Colorado, has a skin of SIPs, and a HERS rating of 24.

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Topics: SIPs, Native plants, 2600 to 3400 square feet, Low Flow Faucets, spray foam insulation, radiant heating systems, FSC Certified Lumber, Colorado

Forest Friendly

Posted by Amanda Abrams

May 7, 2014 12:12:00 PM

ROUGHLY 75% OF THE TIMBER in this log home comes from nearby north Ontario and Québec, and has been certified by the Forest Stewardship Council as sustainably grown. The FSC label doesn’t tell a consumer everything about the wood, but the designation covers environmental impact and the forestry management plan, and is considered the best third-party certification available for the industry.  
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Topics: 2600 to 3400 square feet, FSC Certified Lumber, Canada

New Florida

Posted by Matt Power

Apr 15, 2014 4:57:00 PM

Florida, one of the fastest growing states, is not known for its green housing. But this LEED Gold home in Winter Park, not far from Orlando, breaks that pattern. Its contemporary design contains many elements familiar in what you might call the “snowbird vernacular” of modern Florida architecture: large expanses of glass, an open floorplan, a back yard lanai, and an open interior with little trim. But unlike so many Florida homes--built to code but no better--nearly every aspect of this home has an energy- or water-saving purpose.  
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Topics: Green Landscaping, LEED, Energy Recovery Ventilation, HERS, 2600 to 3400 square feet, natural daylighting, green roof, 2010 Green Home of the Year Awards, LED Lighting, rainwater harvesting, salvaged materials, Florida, Recycled Products


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