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New Neighbor

Posted by Green Builder Staff

Aug 5, 2014 10:41:00 AM

THIS UNUSUAL NINE-UNIT multifamily project in San Francisco’s Mission District covers three adjacent lots, with three units on each lot, divided by a partially shared courtyard. The narrow lots conceal a surprisingly ample amount of floor space (between 1,200 square feet and 1,600 square feet per unit), and a mix of private and shared parking garages. The developer selected the site in part because of its many transit options—including walking—so automobiles play a supporting role in the
design.
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Topics: 1500 square feet or less, solar hot water, zero-VOC, water saving, multi-family

Reclaimed Design

Posted by Green Builder Staff

Aug 4, 2014 4:35:00 PM

WHEN THE OWNERS of this 1,015-square-foot weekend lake cabin explained their dream to builder Don Ferrier, they told him they wanted the house to look like it had been there for 100 years. What they got is a net-zero gem that is currently the greenest house in Texas, per the Green Built Texas certification program.

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Topics: net-zero energy, 1500 square feet or less, standing seam metal roof, salvaged materials

Tiny Houses: Artistic Hideaway

Posted by Juliet Grable

Jun 9, 2014 3:58:00 PM

MOTIVATED TO REDUCE their footprint and their overhead, Kol Peterson and Deb Delman chose a lot in a walkable, bikeable Northeast Portland neighborhood for their Accessory Dwelling Unit, or ADU.
“The project encompassed a bunch of passions,” says Peterson, who works as Web manager for the Forest Service. Stephen Smith of Design Build Portland acted as general contractor, but Peterson and Delman put in an estimated $15,000 in sweat equity.

Their two-bedroom house measures 799 square feet, but feels much larger, thanks to Studio Eccos designer Brint Riggs’ open plan. The ground level includes a vaulted kitchen, living room nook and a corner office that doubles as a second bedroom. Upstairs, a short bridge connects the master bedroom to the bathroom, and shows off the custom steel railing.

Local artisans added personal touches to the house. Eric Bohne and stained-glass artist David Schlicker collaborated on a stained-glass starburst in a hinged steel frame, which acts as a sound barrier between the master bedroom and the vaulted space. Peterson sourced fixtures from the Habitat for Humanity ReStore, flooring from Craigslist, doors from the Rebuilding Center.

Their ADU has been featured on Portland’s Build it Green! (BIG!) Tour two years in a row, and earned an Energy Performance Score of 35. The project came in at just under $100,000; best of all, rental income from the front house now covers the couple’s mortgage.

“I didn’t know a thing about this when we started,” says Peterson, who chronicled the experience in a detailed blog. Last year he began hosting workshops to help people navigate through the process of building their own ADUs.
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Topics: 1500 square feet or less, Energy Recovery Ventilation, energy efficient windows, LED Lighting, Recycled Products

Near Future Vision

Posted by Green Builder Staff

May 31, 2014 1:02:15 PM

The 1962 World’s Fair in Seattle celebrated all things Space Age, including the American Home of the Immediate Future, a prefab modular house. Fifty years later, the Miller Hull Partnership’s Ron Rochon decided to revisit the idea.
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Topics: net-zero energy, 1500 square feet or less, radiant heating systems, Recycled Products

Cubist Fantasy

Posted by Green Builder Staff

May 29, 2014 7:25:00 PM

In 2009, Revelations Architecture conceived the E.D.G.E. (Experimental Dwelling for a Greener Environment) House, a 360-foot modular concept home that won the AIA Small Projects Award in 2011. Last year, principal architect Bill Yudchitz collaborated with his son, architect Dan Yudchitz, on the Essential House. A more pragmatic and affordable version of its predecessor, this year’s two-story cube measures 1,000 square feet, and includes a sleeping loft, storage and a utility room. “The Essential House could be put on any infill site in the U.S.,” asserts Bill Yudchitz.

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Topics: 1500 square feet or less, passive solar, rainwater harvesting, urban


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